Texas Wesleyan University fires coach who discriminated against player from Colorado due to marijuana legality

Texas Wesleyan University fired baseball coach and former Major League Baseball player Mike Jeffcoat after it was revealed that he discriminated against a high school player due to Colorado’s marijuana laws, CBS Denver reports. The potential recruit, Gavin Bell, attends high school in Colorado. Jeffcoat said past recruits “had trouble passing our drug test.”

Darren McKee, a radio show host in Denver, published the email sent to the player by Jeffcoat. In the email, Jeffcoat wrote:

Hi Gavin,

Thanks for the interest in our program. Unfortunately, we are not recruiting players from the state of Colorado. In the past, players have had trouble passing our drug test. We have made a decision to not take a chance on Student-athletes from your state. You can thank your liberal politicians. Best of Luck wherever you decide to play.

Mike Jeffcoat
Head Baseball Coach
Texas Wesleyan University

CBS Denver also notes that a violation of a National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics rule was discovered, unrelated to the email/recruiting issue.

Texas Wesleyan University president Frederick Slabach said, “I want to make sure he knows that the comments contained in that email absolutely do not express the values of this university and we would love to have Gavin here as a student.” Slabach also said TWU “does not tolerate discrimination.” He continued, “We value inclusiveness. We value education, critical thinking, and supporting student athletes who are here for the love of the game.”

Jeffcoat, 58, went to high school in Arkansas and attended college at Louisiana Tech University. The Indians selected him in the 13th round of the 1980 draft. He went on to have a 10-year career in the majors from 1983-94, playing for the Indians, Giants, Rangers, and Marlins. Jeffcoat had been the head coach of TWU’s baseball team since 2002.

Jeffcoat may find it interesting that, following Colorado’s legalization, marijuana use among teens has actually declined, as the Washington Post reported in December. Furthermore, for teens, the usage rates of alcohol, tobacco, and heroin also sharply declined following legalization. You can thank your liberal politicians.